Expanded Knowledge about Human Metabolome Expected to Fuel Development of New Therapeutic Drugs and Medical Laboratory Tests

Pathologists and clinical laboratory professionals can expect to see new molecular test development as researchers develop new biomarkers in the wake of expanded knowledge of the genome-metabolome-diseasome correlates One field of science that bears great potential for use in diagnostics and medical laboratory testing involves the human metabolome. Researchers are gaining more understanding of the genetic underpinnings of complex disease and drug response through metabolic pathways. For...

Harvard Researchers Create Chip-based, Liquid Biopsy Device That Offers a Novel Way to Monitor Treatment of Ovarian Cancer Patients and Only Costs $1

The ATC Chip identifies ovarian cancer cells floating in ascites and may be useful for diagnosing other types of malignancies that involve ascites, like pancreatic cancer Pathologists will be interested to learn that researchers at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital are developing a “liquid biopsy” technology specifically to enable point-of-care monitoring of the progress of patients undergoing treatment for certain types of cancers. The goal is to develop a method that...

In Vivo Pathology Testing Might Use Injectable Microbeads to Detect Excessive Glucose Levels

Japanese Researchers Used Fluorescence to Accurately Measure Blood Glucose Levels in Mice In Japan, researchers are developing a new in vivo diagnostic test technology that can monitor blood glucose in real time. Pathologists and clinical laboratory managers will quickly grasp the implications of these implantable, fluorescable microbeads that can be used to accurately and continuously measure blood sugar levels. The Japanese researchers created tiny microbeads that glow when in contact with...

Magnetic Biomarker Chip Spots Cancer Before It Develops

Up to 400 times more sensitive than existing ELISA-based methods Detecting any of seven cancers in their earliest stages may be feasible through the use of a new biomarker chip that was recently unveiled by scientists from Stanford University’s Center for Magnetic Nanotechnology. To give their biomarker chip increased sensitivity over fluorescent detection methods, the scientists use magnetic technologies to accomplish detection. Reporting in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences...
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