Japanese Researchers Create Inexpensive Palm-Size Microfilter That Captures Circulating Tumor Cells from Minute Amounts of Blood

Its low cost may advance liquid biopsy cancer testing used by anatomic pathologists and improve outcomes by speeding time to diagnosis and treatment Researchers in Japan say they have created a circulating tumor cell (CTC) detection solution that is inexpensive and easy to run. Such a device would be of huge interest to investors and companies wishing to develop clinical laboratory tests that use circulating tumor cells in the blood to identify patients with cancer. In a proof-of-concept...

University of Michigan Researchers Use “Labyrinth” Chip Design in Clinical Trial to Capture Circulating Tumor Cells of Different Cancer Types

Research goal was to isolate circulating tumor cells in venipuncture samples with improved purity compared to standard spiral chips Many research teams are pursuing the goal of creating assays that detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) that would allow earlier and more accurate diagnosis of cancer. Now comes news of a unique technology developed at the University of Michigan (U-M) Ann Arbor that showed promised in an early study. The method of using CTCs to diagnose cancer in patients, while...

Super-Fast Microscope Captures Circulating Tumor Cells with High Sensitivity and Resolution in Real Time

Pathology groups and clinical labs could use the world’s fastest camera to diagnose cancer at earlier stages There’s a new optical microscope that can detect rogue cancer cells. It was developed by engineers at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA). The achievement could create new diagnostic capabilities for pathology and clinical laboratory medicine. New Instrument Detects Circulating Tumor Cells The target for this new high-speed microscope are Circulating cancer tumor cells...

Genentech Scientists Zero in on “Liquid Biopsies” as a Way to Replace Tissue Biopsies in Breast Cancer

Surgical pathologists could gain new tool to diagnose many types of cancers It might soon be possible to determine the HER2 status of breast cancer patients from blood samples rather than tissue biopsies. If this new technology proves feasible, it would give surgical pathologists and medical laboratories a different, and possibly less complex, methodology to use when assessing a case of breast cancer. In its report about the study, Medscape Medical News, wrote that “HER2 status derived from...
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