Patent Dispute over CRISPR Gene-Editing Technology May Determine Who Will Be Paid Licensing Royalties by Medical Laboratories

U.S. Patent and Trademark Office will hold hearings to determine whether University of California Berkeley, or Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, should receive patents for new genomic engineering technique In the race to master gene-editing in ways that will advance genetic medicine and patient care, one of the hottest technologies is CRISPR, which stands for Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats. But now a patent fight has the potential to complicate how pathologists and...

Harvard Researchers Demonstrate a New Method to Deliver Gene-editing Proteins into Cells: Possibly Creating a New Diagnostic Opportunity for Pathologists

This technology has potential to create a demand for pathologists to do genetic analysis as a companion diagnostic in support of physicians treating patients with gene-editing proteins Researchers at Harvard University have demonstrated a new method to deliver gene-editing proteins into cells. This breakthrough could eventually trigger a demand for pathologists to do genetic analysis as the companion diagnostic needed to help clinicians select appropriate gene-editing therapies for their...

Study of Urologists Who Refer Patients for Imaging to Facilities They Own is Published by the New England Journal of Medicine

Radiology and pathology associations are supporting a new bill in Congress to address self-referrals made by urologists Criticism is mounting against urologists who refer their patients to radiation providers in which they have an ownership relationship. This criticism is strikingly similar to concerns that pathologists and others have expressed about situations where urologists refer their patients to anatomic pathology laboratories in which they have an ownership relationship. Study about...

Pathologists Watch as New Lab-on-a-Chip Technology Is Developed for Testing Patients in Doctor’s Offices

Goal is to Help Physicians Perform More Medical Laboratory Testing in Their Clinics New microfluidic nanotechnology has the potential to create reliable “mini-labs” that can allow physicians to do many of the same medical laboratory tests in their offices that are currently performed in the today’s more complex clinical laboratories and anatomic pathology groups. Some experts predict that recent advancements in lab-on-a-chip devices can make it possible for physicians to perform in-office many...
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