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Ex-Theranos Founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes Reduced Her Prison Sentence by Nearly Two Years

Good behavior in federal prison by the disgraced founder of the now-defunct clinical laboratory company earned her the reduction in her original sentence of 11 years

Elizabeth Holmes, founder of failed clinical laboratory blood analysis company Theranos, continues to serve a lengthy term in prison after being convicted of multiple counts of fraud in 2022. However, now comes news that good behavior at her federal prison has shortened her sentence by nearly two years, according to NBC News.

The latest reduction took Holmes’ release from December 2032 to August 2032 in her “11-plus-year (135 month) prison sentence for wire fraud and conspiracy,” NBC reported, adding that Holmes, though Theranos, “defrauded investors out of hundreds of millions of dollars.”

Holmes entered FPC Bryan, a federal prison camp in Bryan, Texas, to begin serving her term in May 2023.

“Holmes had her sentence computation done within the first 30 days of arriving at Bryan,” Forbes reported. Given Good Conduct Time (GCT), Holmes was given 608 days off calculated from the start of her sentence. “If she were to incur a disciplinary infraction, some of those days can be taken away. Most all prisoners receive 54 days per year of GCT based on the sentence imposed,” Forbes added.

The Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) can additionally shave off up to a year through its Residential Drug Abuse Program (RDAP). “To qualify, the prisoner must not have a disqualifying offense, such as terrorism or gun charge, and voluntarily provided information that they had a drug or alcohol problem prior to their arrest. This disclosure has to be done prior to sentencing during the pre-sentence interview and must be also documented in the Presentence Report, a detailed report used by the BOP to determine things like classification and programming for the prisoner,” Forbes noted.

Additionally, the federal First Step Act, which President Trump signed into law in 2018, enables Holmes to “earn up to 365 days off any imposed sentence by participating in prison programming such as a self-improvement classes, a job, or religious activities,” Forbes reported.

Given the opportunities to shave time off her sentence, Holmes may ultimately serve just 66 months of her original 135 month sentence in federal prison.

Elizabeth Holmes (above) taken backstage at TechCrunch Disrupt San Francisco 2014 when Holmes was at the height of her fame and popularity. At this point, Theranos’ Edison blood testing device had not yet been shown to be a fake. But evidence was mounting as clinical laboratory scientists and anatomic pathologists became aware of the technology’s shortcomings. (Photo copyright: Max Morse/Wikimedia Commons.)

Fall of a Silicon Valley Darling

Theranos boasted breakthrough technology and became an almost overnight sensation in Silicon Valley when it burst onto the scene in 2003. Holmes, a then 19-year-old Stanford University dropout, claimed Theranos would “revolutionize the world of blood testing by reducing sample sizes to a single pin prick,” Quartz reported.

The height of the company saw Theranos valued at $9 billion, which came crashing down when the Wall Street Journal reported in 2015 that questionable accuracy and procedures were being followed by the company, CNN reported.

In “After AACC Presentation, Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos Failed to Convince Clinical Laboratory Scientists and the News Media about Quality of Its Technology,” Dark Daily’s Editor-in-Chief Robert Michel reported on Holmes’ presentation at the American Association of Clinical Chemistry (AACC) annual meeting in 2016, after which the clinical laboratory scientists in attendance were highly skeptical of Holmes’ claims.

“From the moment Holmes concluded her presentation and stepped off the podium on Monday afternoon, she, her company, and her comments became the number one subject discussed by attendees in the halls between sessions and in the AACC exhibit hall,” Michel wrote, adding, “The executive team and the investors at Theranos have burned through their credibility with the media, the medical laboratory profession, and the public. In the future, the company’s claims will only be accepted if presented with scientific data developed according to accepted standards and reviewed by credible third parties. Much of this data also needs to be published in peer-reviewed medical journals held in highest esteem.”

A follow-up Dark Daily ebriefing concerning Theranos covered a fraud settlement with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), sanctions from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), investor lawsuits, consumer lawsuits, and a settlement with Walgreens over claims about Theranos’ Edison portable blood analyzer. Theranos’ web of lies was unraveling.

Theranos Saga Continues

Ultimately, investors who had jumped in early with financial support for Theranos were defrauded of hundreds of millions of dollars and Holmes was sentenced to 11 years/three months behind bars. 

“Theranos had only ever performed roughly a dozen of the hundreds of tests it offered using its proprietary technology, and with questionable accuracy. It also came to light that Theranos was relying on third-party manufactured devices from traditional blood testing companies rather than its own technology,” CNN added.

The company shut down in 2018.

And so, the Elizabeth Holmes saga continues with reductions in her prison sentence for “good behavior.” The irony will likely not be lost on the anatomic pathologists, clinical laboratory scientists, and lab managers who followed the federal trials.

—Kristin Althea O’Connor

Related Information:

Elizabeth Holmes Sees More Months Trimmed from Prison Release Date

Theranos Founder Elizabeth Holmes’ Prison Sentence Keeps Getting Shorter

Hot Startup Theranos Has Struggled with Its Blood-Test Technology

Elizabeth Holmes Shaves More Time Off Her Sentence

The Infatuation with Elizabeth Holmes’ Prison Term

After AACC Presentation, Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos Failed to Convince Clinical Laboratory Scientists and the News Media about Quality of Its Technology

Previously High-Flying Theranos Provides Clinical Laboratories and Pathology Groups with Valuable Lesson on How Quickly Consumer Trust Can Be Lost

University of Warwick Researchers Identity Blood Protein Biomarkers That Can Predict Dementia Onset Years in Advance

With further study, this research may provide clinical laboratories with a new proteomic biomarker for dementia screenings that identifies risk more than 10 years before symptoms appear

Researchers at the University of Warwick in the UK and Fudan University in Shanghai, China, identified four protein biomarkers in blood that they say can predict dementia up to 15 years before diagnosis. They say these biomarkers may lead to clinical laboratory blood tests that offer alternatives to costly brain scans and lumbar punctures for diagnosis of dementia.

The scientists “used the largest cohort of blood proteomics and dementia to date,” according to a University of Warwick news release. This included taking blood from 52,645 “healthy” people without dementia who participated in the UK Biobank—a population-based study cohort, the new release noted.

“The proteomic biomarkers are [easy] to access and non-invasive, and they can substantially facilitate the application of large-scale population screening,” said neurovegetative disease specialist Jin-tai Yu, MD, PhD, a professor at Fudan University and co-author of the study, in the news release.

The scientists published their findings in the journal Nature Aging titled, “Plasma Proteomic Profiles Predict Future Dementia in Healthy Adults.”

“The advent of proteomics offers an unprecedented opportunity to predict dementia onset,” the researchers wrote.

“This is a well-conducted study that adds to what we know about changes in blood that occur very early in diseases that cause dementia, which will be important for early diagnosis in the future,” said Tara Spires-Jones, PhD, in a post from the Science Media Center in the UK. “However,” she added, “it is important to note that these are still scientific research studies and that there are currently no blood tests available for routine use that can diagnose dementia with certainty.

Jones, who was not involved in the study, is President of the British Neuroscience Association (BNA) and group leader of the UK Dementia Research Institute at the University of Edinburgh.

“Based on this study, it does seem likely that blood tests will be developed that can predict risk for developing dementia over the next 10 years, although individuals at higher risk often have difficulty knowing how to respond,” Suzanne Schindler, MD, PhD (above), told Reuters. Schindler, an Associate Professor of Neurology at Washington University in St. Louis, was not involved in the research. Clinical laboratories may soon have a new blood test for dementia. (Photo copyright: VJDementia.)

Predicting Onset of Dementia with 90% Accuracy

The researchers analyzed 52,645 blood samples from the UK Biobank (UKBB). The samples were collected between 2006 and 2010 from healthy individuals who at that time were without dementia.

By March 2023, 1,417 of the study participants had developed Alzheimer’s disease or some other form of dementia. The researchers looked at 1,463 proteins and identified four that were present in high levels among those people:

“Individuals with higher GFAP levels were 2.32 times more likely to develop dementia,” the researchers wrote in Nature Aging. “Notably, GFAP and LTBP2 were highly specific for dementia prediction. GFAP and NEFL began to change at least 10 years before dementia diagnosis.”

When adding known risk factors such as age, sex, and genetics, the researchers said they could predict onset of dementia with 90% accuracy, according to the University of Warwick news release.

“Our findings strongly highlight GFAP as an optimal biomarker for dementia prediction, even more than 10 years before the diagnosis, with implications for screening people at high risk for dementia and for early intervention,” the researchers wrote.

The news release also noted that smaller studies had already identified some of the proteins as potential biomarkers, “but this new research was much larger and conducted over several years.”

Further Validation Needed

Amanda Heslegrave, PhD, of the UK Dementia Research Institute, University College London described the UKBB as “an excellent resource” in the Science Media Center (SMC) post. However, she noted, it’s “a highly curated biobank and may not capture all populations that we need to know the risk for. The new biomarkers identified will need further validation before being used as screening tools.”

Another expert raised additional questions about the University of Warwick/Fudan University study in the SMC post.

“These results may help researchers understand the biological systems involved in the development of dementia,” said David Curtis, MD, PhD, of the UCL Genetics Institute at University College London. “However in my view the strengths of the reported associations are not really strong enough to say that these would form a useful test for predicting who will get dementia in the future.”

Conversely, Curtis pointed to other studies suggesting that phosphorylated tau (p-tau) proteins are better candidates for developing a simple blood test.

P-tau “provides a very good indicator of whether the pathological processes leading to Alzheimer’s disease are present in the brain,” he said. “When effective treatments for Alzheimer’s disease are developed it will be very helpful indeed to have simple blood tests—such as measuring phosphorylated tau—available in order to identify who could benefit.”

At least two blood tests based on the p-tau217 variant—from ALZpath and C2N—are currently available to US clinicians as laboratory developed tests (LDT).

In “University of Gothenburg Study Findings Affirm Accuracy of Clinical Laboratory Blood Test to Diagnose Alzheimer’s Disease,” Dark Daily reported on a study from the University of Gothenburg in Sweden which found that the ALZpath test was as good or better than lumbar punctures and brain scans as a diagnostic tool for Alzheimer’s.

UK Biobank

The UK Biobank continues to be used by researchers both in the UK and abroad because of the full sets of data on large numbers of patients over many years. There are few other sources of such data elsewhere in the world. The UK Biobank is a large-scale biomedical database and research resource. It contains de-identified genetic, lifestyle and health information, and biological samples from 500,000 UK participants.

On its website, the UK Biobank states, “It is the most comprehensive and widely-used dataset of its kind and is globally accessible to approved researchers who are undertaking health-related research that is in the public interest, whether they are from academic, commercial, government or charitable settings.”

Thus, clinical laboratory managers and pathologists can expect a continuing stream of published studies that identify biomarkers associated with different health conditions and to see where the data used in these analyses came from the UK’s biobank.

—Stephen Beale

Related Information:

Protein Biomarkers Predict Dementia 15 Years Before Diagnosis, According to New Study

Plasma Proteomic Profiles Predict Future Dementia in Healthy Adults

Proteins May Predict Who Will Get Dementia 10 Years Later, Study Finds

Expert Reaction to Study of Potential Protein Biomarkers for Dementia Risk

Two New p-Tau217 Blood Tests Join a Crowded Field

Plasma p-Tau-217 Assays Work Well, But No Home Run for Diagnosis

Dementia Can Be Predicted More than a Decade Before Diagnosis with These Blood Proteins

Dementia Predicted 10 Years Before Diagnosis

Early Blood Test to Predict Dementia Is Step Closer as Biological Markers Identified

Validating Blood Tests as A Possible Routine Diagnostic Assay of Alzheimer’s Disease

University of Pittsburgh Pathologists Create World Tumor Registry to Assist Medical Professionals in the Identification and Diagnosis of Cancers

As the cancer registry expands it will increasing become more useful to anatomic pathologists, histopathologists, oncologists, and even clinical laboratories

Oncologists, histopathologists, anatomic pathologists, and other cancer physicians now have a powerful new Wikipedia-style tumor registry to help them with their diagnoses and in educating patients on their specific types of cancer. Clinical laboratory managers may find it useful to understand the value this searchable database, and it can help their staff pathologists as well.

Free to use by both physicians and patients the World Tumor Registry (WTR) is designed “to minimize diagnostic errors by giving doctors a searchable online database of cancers that have been collected and categorized with cellular images collected from around the world,” Pittsburg-Post Gazette reported.

Prompt, accurate cancer diagnoses offer cancer patients the best chance for optimal treatment outcomes. However, many medical professionals around the globe do not have the training and resources to offer superior cancer diagnoses. That deficiency can translate to inferior treatment options and lower survival rates among cancer patients. 

To help improve cancer diagnoses, pathologist Yuri E. Nikiforov, MD, PhD, Division Director, Molecular and Genomic Pathology, Vice Chair of the Department of Pathology,  and Professor of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh, developed the WTR to provide educational and practical resources for individuals and organizations involved in cancer research.

Officially announced at the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology (USCAP) annual convention, the WTR is an open-access catalog of digital microscopic images of human cancer types and subtypes.

The lower cost of technology and improved speed of access via the internet are technologies enabling this effort.

“We are creating sort of a Wikipedia for cancer images,” said Alyaksandr V. Nikitski, MD, PhD (above), Research Assistant Professor of Pathology, Division of Molecular and Genomic Pathology at Pittsburg School of Medicine and Administrative Director of the WTR, in an exclusive interview with Dark Daily. “Anyone in the world, if they can access the internet, can look at the well-annotated, diagnostic digital slides of cancer,” said Nikitski. Clinical laboratories may also find this new pathology tool useful. (Photo copyright: Alyaksandr V. Nikitski)

Minimizing Diagnostic Errors

Based in Pittsburgh, the WTR is freely available to anyone for viewing digital pathology slides of known cancer tumors as well as borderline and questionable cases. On the website, individuals can search for pictures of tumors in the registry by diagnosis, specific cohorts, and by microscopic features. Individuals may search further by tumor type and subtype to receive a picture of related tumors. 

According to the WTR website, the mission of the nonprofit “is to minimize diagnostic errors, eliminate inequality in cancer recognition, diagnosis, and treatment in diverse populations, and improve outcomes by increasing access to the diagnostic pathology expertise and knowledge of microscopic characteristics of cancers that occur in different geographic, environmental, and socio-economic settings.”

This new comprehensive initiative will eventually encompass cancer images from all over the world. 

“Let’s assume that I am a pathologist or a trainee who has little experience, or I don’t have access to collections of atypical tumors,” Nikitski explained. “I can view tumor collections online [in the WTR database] and check how typical and rare tumors look in various geographic regions and environmental settings.”

Once an image of a slide is selected, users will then receive a brief case history of the tumor in addition to such data as the age of the patient, their geographic location, sex, family history of the disease, and the size and stage of the tumor.

Increasing Probability of Correct Diagnosis

Pathologists and clinicians may also predict the probability of a particular diagnosis by searching under the microscopic feature of the database. This feature utilizes an innovative classifier known as PathDxFinder, where users may compare a slide from their lab to slides in the database by certain criteria. This includes:

After completing the questions above, the user presses the “predict diagnosis” button to receive the probability of cancer and most likely diagnosis based on the answers provided in the questionnaire.

WTR Editorial Boards

The WTR represents collections for each type of cancer site, such as lung or breast. A chairperson and editorial board are responsible for reviewing submitted slides before they are placed online. The editorial boards include 20 pathologists who are experts in diagnosing cancer categories, Nikitski explained.

Thousands of identified microscopic whole slide images (WSI) representing various types of cancer are deposited by the editors and other contributors to the project. The editorial board then carefully analyzes and compiles the data before posting the images for public viewing. 

The editorial boards are located in five world regions:

  • Africa and the Middle East
  • Asia and Oceania
  • Central and South America
  • North America and Europe
  • Northern Asia

Any physicians or pathologists can contribute images to the database, by “simply selecting the editor of their region on the website, writing their name, and asking if they can submit tumor cases,” Nikitski stated.

“We have established a platform that allows pathologists to contact editors who are in the same geographic region,” he added.

Helping Physicians Identify Cancer Types 

In a YouTube video, Nikiforov states that the WTR is an “educational nonprofit organization rooted in [the] beliefs that every cancer patient deserves accurate and timely diagnosis as the first and essential step in better treatment and outcomes.”

“We believe this can be achieved only when modern diagnostic tools and technologies are freely available to every physician and pathologist. Only when we understand how microscopic features of cancer vary in different geographic, environmental and ethnic populations, and only by integrating histopathology with clinical immunohistochemical and molecular genetic information for every cancer type,” he stated.

Since patient privacy is important, the database contains only basic data about patients, and all patient information is protected.

Launched in March, there are currently more than 400 thyroid tumor slides available to view in the online database. At the time of the announcement, the WTR platform was planned to be implemented in three phases:

  • Thyroid cancer (released in March of this year).
  • Lung cancer and breast cancer (anticipated to be completed by the third quarter of 2026).
  • Remaining cancers, including brain, soft tissue and bone, colorectal, head and neck, hematolymphoid, female genital, liver, pancreatic, prostate and male genital, skin, urinary system, pediatric, other endocrine cancers, and rare cancers (anticipated to be completed by the end of 2029).

“We believe that this resource will help physicians and pathologists practicing in small or big or remote medical centers to learn how cancer looks under a microscope in their own communities,” Nikiforov said in the video. “We also see WTR as a platform that connects physicians and scientists from different parts of the world who can work together to better understand and treat cancer.”

Catalogs like the World Tumor Registry might potentially create a pool of information that that could be mined by analytical and artificial intelligence (AI) platforms to ferret out new ways to improve the diagnosis of certain types of cancer and even enable earlier diagnoses. 

“It is an extremely useful resource,” Nikitski said.

Anatomic pathologists will certainly find it so. And clinical laboratory managers may find the information useful as well when interacting with histopathologists and oncologists. 

—JP Schlingman

Related Information:

“Free for the World:” Pittsburgh Pathologist Prepares to Launch a Wikipedia for Cancer

USCAP 113th Annual Meeting

World Tumor Registry

Video: Message from the Founder and President of the World Tumor Registry

NIH Scientists Develop New Clinical Laboratory Assay to Measure Effectiveness of ‘Good’ Cholesterol

Clinical studies show that new ‘cell-free’ test can predict cardiovascular disease risk better than standard HDL cholesterol test

Researchers from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have developed a diagnostic assay that measures how well high-density lipoprotein (HDL)—the so-called “good” cholesterol—is working in the body. And their findings could lead to new clinical laboratory tests that supplement standard HDL level testing to better determine a person’s risk for heart disease.

Cholesterol tests are among the most commonly performed assays by clinical laboratories. A new test that reveals how well HDL is working in the body would certainly boost a medical laboratory’s test requisition volume.

The researchers are with the NIH’s National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI).

“Measuring HDL function is limited to research labs and isn’t conducive to large-scale testing by routine clinical laboratories. To try to solve that problem, researchers from NHLBI’s Lipoprotein Metabolism Laboratory created a new diagnostic test,” noted an NHLBI news release.

“This is going to quicken the pace of basic research,” said Edward B. Neufeld, PhD, who along with guest researcher Masaki Sato, PhD, developed the test. “It increases the number of samples that you can study. It increases the number of experiments you can do.”

The researchers published their findings in The Journal of Clinical Investigation titled, “Cell-Free, High-Density Lipoprotein–Specific Phospholipid Efflux Assay Predicts Incident Cardiovascular Disease.” They have also patented their test and plan to work with a company on licensing and manufacturing it.

Such a new cholesterol test would quickly become one of the most commonly performed clinical lab tests because just about every American who has a physical gets cholesterol tests as part of that process.

“Other people may modify this or come up with better versions, which is fine with us,” Edward Neufeld, PhD (above), NHLBI Staff Scientist, said in a news release. “We just really wanted to tackle this problem of evaluating HDL function.” Clinical laboratories may soon have a new cholesterol test to supplement standard HDL level testing. (Photo copyright: ResearchGate.)

Faster Answers Needed about HDL 

According to the NIH, the goal should go beyond measuring level of HDL as part of a person’s annual physical. What is also needed is finding out whether HDL cholesterol is effectively doing certain tasks, such as removing extra cholesterol from arteries and transporting it to the liver.

The NHLBI’s new cell-free test may make it possible to step up large-scale clinical testing of HDL function, according to the news release. As it stands now, HDL function study has been limited to research labs where testing involves “harvesting cells in the lab [which] can take days to process,” according to NIH Record.

“Most studies to date that have assessed CAD (coronary artery disease) risk by HDL functionality still use the CEC (cellular cholesterol efflux capacity) in vitro assay and are based on the use of radioisotopes (3H-cholesterol) and cultured cells, which is very labor intensive and impractical to do in a clinical laboratory,” the researchers wrote in The Journal of Clinical Investigation. They also pointed out that CEC batch-to-batch variability does not fit clinical laboratories’ need for standardization.

Advantages of NHLBI’s Test  

To overcome these barriers, the NHLBI researchers created an HDL-specific phospholipid efflux (HDL-SPE) assay that has certain advantages over current HDL function assessments done in research labs.

According to the NIH, the HDP-SPE assay:

  • Is easy to replicate in clinical labs.
  • Is more suited to automation and large samples.
  • Offers up results in about an hour.
  • Is a better predictor of cardiovascular disease risk than HDL cholesterol testing for CAD risk.

“We developed a cell-free, HDL-specific phospholipid efflux assay for the assessment of CAD risk on the basis of HDL functionality in whole plasma or serum. One of the main advantages of the HDL-SPE assay is that it can be readily automated, unlike the various CEC assays currently in use,” the authors noted in their paper.

Here is how the test is performed, according to the NIH:

  • Plasma with HDL is separated from the patient’s blood.
  • “Plasma is added to donor particles coated with a lipid mixture resembling plaque and a fluorescent-tagged phospholipid” that only HDL can remove.
  • The fluorescent signal by HDL is then measured.
  • A bright signal suggests optimal HDL lipid removal function, while a dim light means reduced function.

The test builds on the scientists’ previous findings and data. In creating the new assay they drew on data from:

  • A study of 50 severe CAD and 50 non-CAD people.
  • A Japanese study of 70 CAD and 154 non-CAD participants.
  • Examined association of HDL-SPE with cardiovascular disease in a study of 340 patients and 340 controls.

“We have established the HDL-SPE assay for assessment of the functional ability of HDL to efflux phospholipids. Our combined data consistently show that our relatively simple HDL-SPE assay captures a pathophysiologically relevant parameter of HDL function that is at least equivalent to the CEC assay in its association with prevalent and incident CAD,” the researchers concluded in The Journal of Clinical Investigation

Test May Be Subject to New FDA Rule

While HDL cardiovascular-related research is moving forward, studies aimed at the therapeutic side need to pick up, NIH noted.

“Someday we may have a drug that modulates HDL and turns out to be beneficial, but right now we don’t have that,” said Alan Remaley MD, PhD, NHLBI Senior Investigator and Head of the Lipoprotein Metabolism Laboratory, in the news release.

It may be years before the HDL-SPE test is used in medical settings, the researchers acknowledged, adding that more studies are needed with inclusion of different ethnicities.

Additionally, in light of the recently released US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) final rule on regulation of laboratory developed tests (LDT), the company licensed to bring the test to market may need to submit the HDL-SPE assay to the FDA for premarket review and clearance. That could lengthen the time required for the developers to comply with the FDA before the test is used by doctors and clinical laboratories in patient care.

—Donna Marie Pocius

Related Information:

FDA Takes Action Aimed at Helping Ensure Safety and Effectiveness of Laboratory Developed Tests

Cell-free, High-Density Lipoprotein-Specific Phospholipid Efflux Assay Predicts Incident Cardiovascular Disease

An Updated Test Measures How Well “Good Cholesterol” Works

NHLBI Refines Test for Good Cholesterol Function

Washington University School of Medicine Researchers Find Accelerated Aging May be Contributing to an Increase in Early-onset Cancers among Young People

More research into accelerated aging may lead to new clinical laboratory and anatomic pathology testing biomarkers for early-onset cancer

Could accelerated aging be contributing to the rise in early-onset cancer rates among younger individuals? A recent study conducted at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis (WUSTL) claims the condition may be partially to blame for the increase in cancer diagnoses among young people. But what is accelerated aging, and what tests will clinical laboratories be required to perform to help physicians diagnose early-onset cancer in that age group?

“Accelerated aging—when someone’s biological age [how old one’s cells are] is greater than their chronological age [how long one has existed]—could increase the risk of cancer tumors,” Fox News reported.

In their presentation at the 2024 American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) annual meeting, the WUSTL researchers noted that “individuals born in or after 1965 had a 17% higher likelihood of accelerated aging than those born between 1950 and 1954,” according to an AACR news release.

The scientists studied “the association between accelerated aging and the risk of early-onset cancers,” and found that “each standard deviation increase in accelerated aging was associated with a 42% increased risk of early-onset lung cancer, a 22% increased risk of early-onset gastrointestinal cancer, and a 36% increased risk of early-onset uterine cancer.”

“Multiple cancer types are becoming increasingly common among younger adults in the United States and globally,” said Ruiyi Tian, MPH, a PhD candidate at WUSTL, in the news release. “Understanding the factors driving this increase will be key to improve the prevention or early detection of cancers in younger and future generations.”

Tian was part of the team conducting the study at the Cao Lab at WUSTL. The primary function of this lab is to uncover risk factors for various cancers and develop precision medicine protocols for cancer prevention and treatment. 

“Historically, both cancer and aging have been viewed primarily as concerns for older populations,” Ruiyi Tian, MPH (above), a graduate student at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and one of the study’s researchers, told Fox News. “The realization that cancer, and now aging, are becoming significant issues for younger demographics over the past decades was unexpected.” Clinical laboratories and anatomic pathologists will likely be performing cancer testing on younger populations as incidences of early-onset cancer increase. (Photo copyright: Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.)

Biological versus Chronological Aging

A study published last year in BMJ Oncology titled, “Global Trends in Incidence, Death, Burden and Risk Factors of Early-Onset Cancer from 1990 to 2019,” stated that early onset of 29 cancers increased by almost 79% globally between 1990 and 2019. Early-onset cancer deaths rose by almost 28% during that time period. 

The WUSTL researchers set out to prove that both chronological age and biological age could be determining factors in early-onset cancers. Chronological age refers to the amount of time an individual has been alive, while biological age refers to the age of cells and tissues based on physiological evidence.

“We all know cancer is an aging disease. However, it is really coming to a younger population,” said Yin Cao, MPH, Associate Professor of Surgery at WUSTL and senior author of the study, told CNN. “So, whether we can use the well-developed concept of biological aging to apply that to the younger generation is a really untouched area.”

To perform the research, the scientists examined data of 148,724 individuals between the ages of 37 and 54 located in the UK Biobank database. They calculated each person’s biological age by examining nine biomarkers found in blood:

They then input the data into the PhenoAge algorithm which estimated the biological age of each person.

“Individuals whose biological age was higher than their chronological age were defined as having accelerated aging,” the AACR news release noted.

The next step was to calculate each person’s level of accelerated aging by comparing biological and chronological ages. They then looked at how many of the individuals studied had been diagnosed with early-onset cancers.

For the WUSTL study, early-onset cancers were defined as cancers that were diagnosed before age 55. The researchers found 3,200 cases where such cancers had been discovered. 

Faster Agers Twice as Likely to Develop Early-onset Cancer

The scientists then compared the data of people who showed slower aging to those showing faster aging based on the biobank samples. They found that individuals who had the highest accelerated aging were twice as likely to be diagnosed with early-onset lung cancer, had a 60% higher risk of gastrointestinal tumors, and had a more than 80% higher risk of uterine cancer.

“By examining the relationship between accelerating aging and the risk of early-onset cancers, we provide a fresh perspective on the shared etiology of early-onset cancers,” Tian said in the news release. “If validated, our findings suggest that interventions to slow biological aging could be a new avenue for cancer prevention, and screening efforts tailored to younger individuals with signs of accelerated aging could help detect cancers early.”

More clinical studies and research are needed to determine if accelerated aging truly is causing a rise in early-onset cancers. The fact that all of the participants in this study were from the United Kingdom indicates that future studies should include more diverse populations.

Studying accelerated aging’s influence on early-onset cancer may lead to new biomarkers that clinical laboratories and anatomic pathologists can use to help physicians diagnose the condition. Laboratory scientists and pathologists will want to follow any ongoing research and studies on the trend, as ‘accelerated aging’ might be identified as a new disorder to look for when diagnosing and treating cancers. 

—JP Schlingman

Related Information:

Accelerated Aging May Increase the Risk of Early-onset Cancers in Younger Generations

Cancer Rates Rising in Young People Due to ‘Accelerated Aging,’ New Study Finds: ‘Highly Troubling’

Global Trends in Incidence, Death, Burden and Risk Factors of Early-onset Cancer from 1990 to 2019

Accelerated Aging Linked to Cancer Risk in Younger Adults, Research Shows

Accelerated Aging May be a Cause of Increased Cancers in People under 55

Utah Cancer Researcher Says New Accelerated Aging Study Needs More Examination

What to Know about Rising Rates of ‘Early-Onset’ Cancer

Chronological vs. Biological Age

Early-onset Cancer: Faster Biological Aging May be Driving Rates in Young Adults

Rise in Cancer Rates among Young People Contributes to New Phenomenon of ‘Turbo Cancers’ as a Cause for Concern

American Cancer Society Annual Report Shows Cervical Cancer Rate Increasing, but Only among 30- to 40-Year-Olds

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