University of Maryland Scientists Develop CRISPR-Act 3.0, a New CRISPR Technology for Multiplex Gene Activation in Plants

CRISPR-Act 3.0 could significantly increase crop yields and plant diversity worldwide and help fight against global hunger and climate change Clinical laboratory professionals and pathologists who read Dark Daily are highly aware of CRISPR gene editing technology. We’ve covered the topic in multiple ebriefings over many years. But how many know there’s a version of CRISPR specifically designed for editing and activating plant genes? Scientists at the University of Maryland (UMD) developed a...

Another Milestone for CRISPR-Cas9 Technology: First Trial Data for Treatment Delivered Intravenously

Unlike most other CRISPR/Cas-9 therapies that are ex vivo treatments in which cells are modified outside the body, this study was successful with an in vivo treatment Use of CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing technology for therapeutic purposes can be a boon for clinical laboratories. Not only is this application a step forward in the march toward precision medicine, but it can give clinical labs the essential role of sequencing a patient’s DNA to help the referring physician identify how CRISPR-Cas9...

CRISPR-Cas9 DNA Editing Possibly Linked to Cancer, But CRISPR-Cas13d RNA Editing Could Offer New Avenues for Treatment

CRISPR-Cas9 connection to cancer prompts research to investigate different approaches to gene editing Dark Daily has covered CRISPR-Cas9 many times in previous e-briefings. Since its discovery, CRISPR, or Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats, has been at the root of astonishing breakthroughs in genetic research. It appears to fulfill precision medicine goals for patients with conditions caused by genetic mutations and has anatomic pathologists, along with the entire...

Harvard Medical School Researchers Use CRISPR Technology to Insert Images into the DNA of Bacteria

Technology allows retrievable information to be recorded directly into the genomes of living bacteria, but will this technology have value in clinical laboratory testing? Researchers at Harvard Medical School have successfully used CRISPR technology to encode an image and a short film into the Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of bacteria. Their goal is to develop a way to record and store retrievable information in the genomes of living bacteria. A story in the Harvard Gazette described the new...
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