EBRC Report Offers a 20-Year Synthetic Biology Roadmap That Could Lead to New Diagnostic Technologies for Clinical Laboratories, Pathologists

The 80 scientists and engineers that comprise the consortium believe synthetic biology can address key challenges in health and medicine, but technical hurdles remain Synthetic biology now has a 20-year development roadmap. Many predict this fast-moving field of science will deliver valuable products that can be used in diagnostics—including clinical laboratory tests, therapeutics, and other healthcare products. Eighty scientists from universities and companies around the world that comprise...

Sound Wave Acoustic Tweezers Locate and Isolate Circulating Tumor Cells in Liquid Biopsies; Could Lead to Less Invasive Cancer Diagnostics and Treatments

Pathologists will be interested to learn that this latest version of the acoustic tweezer device requires about five hours to identify the CTCs in a sample of blood Medical laboratory leaders and pathologists are well aware that circulating tumor cells (CTCs) released by primary tumors into the bloodstream are fragile and easily damaged. Many studies have sought to find ways to separate CTCs from surrounding cells. Such a process could then be used as an early-detection biomarker to detect...

New Approach to Detecting Circulating Tumor Cells in Blood Uses Acoustic Sound Waves and Researchers Are Hopeful that the Technology Can Lead to a Medical Laboratory Test

Innovative device uses acoustic sound waves to gently separate circulating cancer cells from white blood cells In many respects, the ability to separate and identify circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is one of the holy grails of cancer diagnostics. It is widely believed that a clinical laboratory test that can effectively identify CTCs would contribute to earlier detection of cancer and improved outcomes for caner patients. Pathologists will be interested to learn about a useful new tool that can...

New Research Findings Determine that ‘Dark Matter’ DNA Does Useful Work and Opens Door to Develop More Sophisticated Clinical Pathology Laboratory Tests

Researchers at Penn State identified 160,000 ‘transcription initiation machines’ throughout the human genome DNA “dark matter” may have something in common with comedian Rodney Dangerfield, who liked to say, “I don’t get no respect!” As many pathologists know, for years the human exome that has been the focus of most research. This is the 1% of the human genome that contains the genes that produce proteins and do other useful functions. Meanwhile, the remaining 99% of the human...
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