World’s Largest Genetic Study in Iceland Produced New Insights into Gene Function and Disease Predisposition that Could Lead to New Clinical Laboratory Tests

Researchers sequenced the entire genomes of 2,636 Icelanders and gained useful insights into how human genes evolve and mutate Over the past 15 years, Iceland has managed to be at the forefront of genetic research tied to personalized medicine and new biomarkers for diagnostics and therapeutics. This is true because, as most pathologists know, Iceland has a small population that has seen little immigration over the past 1,000 years, along with a progressive government and business community....

Geneticist at University of California Davis Sequences His Unborn Baby’s DNA in a Global First for Whole Genome Sequencing

Prenatal genome sequencing raises ethical issues for gene sequencing labs and clinical labs, since a baby’s genetic information may present lifelong consequences for that individual Pathologists and clinical laboratory managers will be interested to learn that another milestone in genetic testing was reached earlier this year. A geneticist at the University of California at Davis, has sequenced the whole human genome of his unborn baby, the first time this feat has been accomplished. Notably,...

National Institutes of Health Creates Partnership with Big Pharma to Improve Development Success of New Drugs and Diagnostics and Speed FDA Clearance

Pathology groups and clinical laboratories are among the beneficiaries if the Accelerating Medicines Partnership achieves its goals Power players in healthcare are about to invest nearly a quarter of a billion dollars to accelerate the time it takes for new medical discoveries to gain regulatory approval and enter clinical use. The emphasis will be on both therapeutic drugs and diagnostics, making this an important development for in vitro diagnostics companies and medical laboratories....

Meet the Clinical Pathology Laboratory on the Palm of a Hand: Japanese Researchers Announce a Point-of-Care Testing Device That Detects MicroRNA in 20 Minutes

Second-generation device is self-powered, does not require a trained operator, and amplifies the fluorescence signal by 1,000-fold, enabling early detection of cancer Pathologists will be interested to learn that Japanese researchers have developed a second-generation lab-on-a-chip that detects microRNA (miRNA) from a tiny sample volume in only 20 minutes! Their goal is to create a point-of-care device for early detection of cancer. This is another example of how a variety of fast-developing...
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