New Research Findings Determine that ‘Dark Matter’ DNA Does Useful Work and Opens Door to Develop More Sophisticated Clinical Pathology Laboratory Tests

Researchers at Penn State identified 160,000 ‘transcription initiation machines’ throughout the human genome DNA “dark matter” may have something in common with comedian Rodney Dangerfield, who liked to say, “I don’t get no respect!” As many pathologists know, for years the human exome that has been the focus of most research. This is the 1% of the human genome that contains the genes that produce proteins and do other useful functions. Meanwhile, the remaining 99% of the human...

Stanford Researchers Announce ‘Living Computers’ Made from DNA and RNA That Function Inside Human Cells and Could Be Used to Diagnose Cancer

Technology breakthrough might eventually be used by pathologists to help diagnose disease using in vivo diagnostic testing methods Researchers at Stanford University are another step closer to understanding how to make DNA and RNA function like computer chips fabricated from silicon. Their work could eventually form the basis for new types of diagnostic services that could be offered by clinical laboratories and anatomic pathology groups. Stanford Bioengineers Develop Final Component for...
;