Stanford University Study Traces Hospital-Acquired Bloodstream Infections to Patients’ Own Digestive Tract

New bioinformatic tool finds gut microbiota may be ‘potential reservoir of bloodstream pathogens’ suggesting patients’ own bodies can be source of infections Clinical laboratories in hospitals and health networks throughout the nation are collaborating in the priority effort to reduce deaths from sepsis and related blood infections. Now comes news that researchers at Stanford have identified an unexpected source of bloodstream infections. This finding may help medical laboratories contribute...

Collaboration between Pathologists, Medical Laboratories, and Hospital Staff Substantially Reduced Hospital-Acquired Infections, AHRQ Reports

Decline in hospital-acquired conditions (HACs) overall since 2010 attributed to increased attention to safety protocols and practices by hospital staff in cooperation with clinical laboratory services It’s now been almost nine years since the Medicare Program stopped paying hospitals and other providers for certain hospital-acquired conditions (HACs). Included in this list are hospital-acquired infections (HAIs). The goal is to substantially reduce the number of HACs and HAIs, thus improving...

Hospitals Object to CMS’s Web Posting of Raw Data on Hospital-Acquired Infections

American Hospital Association claims accuracy of posted HAC data not established In further step to create transparency in patient outcomes delivered by individual hospitals, the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) has posted on its website information on eight hospital-acquired conditions (HAC). However, many hospital industry leaders were not happy with this action. The CMS data is specific to individual healthcare facilities that treat Medicare patients. It includes info on two...

OIG Estimates that 1 in 7 Medicare Patients are Injured or Killed by Healthcare Providers

That’s not news to pathologists, who often see how physicians mis-order or mis-interpret clinical laboratory tests Each month, one out of seven Medicare patients is injured or killed by their healthcare providers. These medical errors cost taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars each year. And, that doesn’t even include the cost of follow-up care for the injured patients who survive. Those and other conclusions are part of a recently released study by the Department of Health and Human...
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