News, Analysis, Trends, Management Innovations for
Clinical Laboratories and Pathology Groups

Hosted by Robert Michel

News, Analysis, Trends, Management Innovations for
Clinical Laboratories and Pathology Groups

Hosted by Robert Michel
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Even as Patient Satisfaction Surveys Grow in Importance, Hospitals, Physicians, and Clinical Laboratories Struggle to Use That Data to Improve the Patient Experience

Experts point to the challenges: not only is there a lack of consensus in how to best measure patient satisfaction, but there are also different opinions as to what are the right steps providers should take to improve the patient experience

In today’s healthcare industry, “Patient Satisfaction” is high on the list of phrases likely to be heard in any medical facility, including in pathology groups and clinical laboratories. With recent and ongoing changes to the way that providers are paid, patient satisfaction as a measure of quality will only gain in importance.

But if there is consensus that it is important to monitor patient satisfaction and use that data to guide efforts to improve how patients view their care, there is certainly no consensus on the most effective ways to measure patient satisfaction. Nor is there much consensus on how providers, including medical laboratories, should use patient satisfaction data to improve the patient experience.

This challenge is addressed by Deirdre Mylod, PhD, who pointed out in a PatientEngagementHIT article, “The exercise is not to make consumers happy. The exercise is to reduce patient suffering.” Mylod is Executive Director of the Institute for Innovation, a nonprofit research collaborative that publishes relevant and practical findings concerning patient satisfaction that help healthcare organizations deliver better care. (more…)

Duke University Researchers Demonstrate that Non-invasive Optical Biopsy Detects Cancer

New technology could reduce or even eliminate the need for clinical pathology laboratories to utilize tissue biopsies in the diagnosis of certain cancers

“Cancer flashlight” is the nickname some have given to a system that uses novel spectroscopic techniques to detect pre-cancerous cells in the colon. Developed by bioengineers at Duke University, the device may offer an alternative to current biopsy methods for detecting cancer and pre-cancer by anatomic pathologists.

The new technology may be a way to detect abnormal, dysplastic cells in the epithelium of various tissues in a non-invasive way, wrote The Atlantic in a story it recently published. The Atlantic thinks this technology breakthrough may be significant because approximately 85% of all cancers begin within the layers of the epithelium in various parts of the body.
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