US Department of Veterans Affairs’ Million Veterans Program Receives Its 125,000th Whole Human Genome Sequence from Personalis Inc.

As many clinical laboratory scientists know, gene sequencing technology continues to become faster, more accurate, and less expensive per whole human genome sequenced In February, Dark Daily reported that Personalis, Inc. (NASDAQ:PSNL) had delivered its 100,000th whole human genome sequence to the US Department of Veterans Affairs Million Veterans Program (VA MVP). Now, the Menlo Park, Calif.-based cancer genomics company has topped that achievement by delivering its 125,000 whole human genome...

Australian Company Launches At-Home Genetic Test in the US That Claims to Identify a Person’s ‘Risk’ for Contracting the SARS-CoV-2 Coronavirus. But What Science Supports the Test’s Ability to Accurately Assess Risk?

Since all Americans have access to free COVID-19 vaccines, many pathologists and clinical lab managers will ask if this test is even necessary. Some experts say “maybe” Here’s another example of genetic test developers who are willing to push boundaries and sell a diagnostic test directly to consumers that has some diagnostic experts and pathologists challenging its clinical validity. The test was developed by molecular diagnostics company Genetic Technologies Ltd. (NASDAQ:GENE) of Melbourne,...

Penn Medicine Researchers Develop Fast, Accurate, Inexpensive COVID-19 Diagnostic Test Based on Electrochemical Technology

The rapid diagnostic test costs less than $5 per unit and can be adapted for other diseases, the developers say, which opens a slew of possibilities for clinical laboratories Just as the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus spurred deployment of new vaccine technology based on messenger RNA (mRNA), the COVID-19 pandemic also could prove to be a watershed for in vitro diagnostics (IVD) innovation in ways that benefit clinical laboratories. In one notable example, researchers at the Perelman School of...

University of Utah and Sloan Kettering Institute Study Sheds Light on How the Body Recognizes “Good” from Bad Bacteria in the Microbiome

Researchers found that early in life intestinal microorganisms “educate” the thymus to develop T cells; findings could lead to improved immune system therapeutics and associated clinical laboratory tests Researchers at the University of Utah and the Sloan Kettering Institute (SKI)—the experimental research division of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in New York—have uncovered new insights into how the immune system learns to distinguish between harmful infectious bacteria...

International Team of Genetic Researchers Claim to Have Successfully Mapped the Entire Human Genome

With 100% of the human genome mapped, new genetic diagnostic and disease screening tests may soon be available for clinical laboratories and pathology groups Utilizing technology developed by two different biotechnology/genetic sequencing companies, an international consortium of genetic scientists claim to have sequenced 100% of the entire human genome, “including the missing parts,” STAT reported. This will give clinical laboratories access to the complete 3.055 billion base pair (bp)...

International Study into Ancient Poop Yields Insight into the Human Microbiome, May Produce Useful Insights for Microbiologists

By analyzing ancient poop, researchers have discovered how much the human microbiome has changed over the past millennium, what may have brought about the change, and how those changes formed today’s human microbiome Two thousand year-old human poop has yielded new insights into the evolution of the microbial cells (microbiota) inhabiting today’s human gut—collectively known as the human microbiome—that could help pathologists and clinical laboratories better understand diseases that may be...
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